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davonkommen ist kein versprechen

A good goal should scare you a little and excite you a lot. — Chris Soriano (via nobunnyluvsyou)

(via agentlewoman)

Right now you can allow yourself to experience a very simple sense of not knowing - not knowing what or who you are, not knowing what this moment is, not knowing anything. If you give yourself this gift of not knowing and you follow it, a vast spaciousness and mysterious openness dawns within you. Relaxing into not knowing is almost like surrendering into a big, comfortable chair; you just fall into a field of possibility. — Adyashanti - Falling into Grace (via iam-youis)

(via knotformation)

aunties new house. 
I made some jam

I am your secret life, whether you admit it or not. I am the girl you chat with when your real girl is busy with her art, with the rest of her life. I am the girl you call when you want to talk about something and she’s already asleep. I am the girl you get to share your stories of misadventures with, because your real girl might judge if you tell her everything. I am the girl you hang out with when she has to work far away. I am the girl with whom you text the most random things, because she just won’t understand. I am the girl you text dirty stuff with when she’s not around and you need your fix.

- Jens Baldeo 

My nights are for over-thinking; my days are for over-sleeping. — Unknown  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via thatkindofwoman)

I want to be around people that do things. I don’t want to be around people anymore that judge or talk about what people do. I want to be around people that dream and support and do things. — Amy Poehler  (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: psych-facts, via am-clark)

In Turkey, tea is shared in the same way as a handshake in the United States; when you meet someone, whether for the thousandth time or a first time, you have a glass together. Tea in Turkey isn’t just a drink. It’s a ritual deeply ingrained into the fabric of day-to-day social life. Because of this, the way tea is brewed in Turkey is very different from the way it is done in the United States.

[…]

From a design perspective, it’s hard not to admire the Turkish teakettle. Distilled to the essence of its function, the çaydanlık solves many problems at once.

— A design ode to Turkish tea. Compare and contrast with George Orwell’s 11 golden rules for brewing the perfect (British) cup of tea. (via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog, via purpleishboots)